ronindh (ronindh) wrote in japanesemeetup,
ronindh
ronindh
japanesemeetup

  • Mood:

Help spread the word! - www.hurricanehousing.org


Help spread the word! - www.hurricanehousing.org

Hello Everyone,

I received this from Noah at MoveOn.org and I thought I'd pass it along to different LJ boards that I'm a member of. If you can, please print out the flyers and pass them out. I will be printing them out and passing some out down here in Lockport tomorrow if at all possible. While I and my family have a place to stay during this time of tragedy, I'm seeing a LOT of people who don't have anything or anywhere to stay. If you can help out, please do so in any way that you can, be it through monetary or food donations, donations of clothing, blankets and sheets or just volunteer your time.

- Ronin ^_^

__________________________________________________________

Offers to house hurricane evacuees are continuing to pour in—beds for over 250,000 people are now available through HurricaneHousing.org. We've also set up a toll-free housing hotline to help evacuees find housing. But though we've already helped shelter thousands of people, there are tens of thousands more who don't know that a soft bed, a sympathetic ear and a little privacy await them in homes all across America. Please help us make sure families who've relocated to your community benefit from this outpouring of support.

It's easy — just download our flyer about HurricaneHousing.org and our housing hotline, make some copies and take them wherever evacuees are in your area. And if you're volunteering in the relief efforts already, please get the word out to evacuees and relief workers with whom you're in contact. Click here to download the flyer:

http://www.hurricanehousing.org/flyer.html

Then tell us you did it at:

http://civic.moveon.org/katrinasurvey/flyer/

We're doing everything we can to get the word out through relief agencies, local government and television and radio ads. But there are hundreds of thousands of evacuees in shelters, churches, gymnasiums, military bases and hotels who are looking for options and don't know about HurricaneHousing.org. Many of these folks are desperate for a little more normalcy than a shelter can provide, or they're paying for a room but running low on cash. Please help us get the word out.

First, figure out where evacuees are congregated in your community. That might be a stadium, a motel, a church, the line outside the FEMA office or your local food stamp office. In some places, even the Wal-Mart has become a gathering place of sorts. If you're not sure, try scanning the local news or calling the city government.

When you figure out where to go, please make 100 copies (or more!) to hand out. Some volunteers have even taken along their cell phones to help evacuees find housing right away, via our hotline.

Right now, relief efforts are very decentralized, and the best way to get the word out about the incredible wealth of housing at Hurricanehousing.org is for MoveOn members and other volunteers to reach out directly to evacuees and relief workers in every community.

A couple hours of your time can help make the critical connection between someone in need and someone offering assistance. Just click here to get started:

http://www.hurricanehousing.org/flyer.html

The stories we're hearing every day from people who've found housing leave no doubt what a difference this can make—like this one from Ryan:

I wanted to stay close to home. I was born and raised in New Orleans, and can't wait to go back. I thought…I could find a place to live in Baton Rouge. I could not get a hotel room here, and all the shelters here were full. I've never been homeless before. Then [through HurricaneHousing.org] I found two very generous people with a spare room. I have been there for one day. It was the first time I slept in a bed since I left New Orleans. I have been having wicked nightmares but at least I got some rest.

If people can't give water or food, shelter is the next most vital element to sustain life. Offering housing to evacuees is as important as pulling people off rooftops. Because those people are going to need a place to stay if they survive. Thanks for helping me survive, and if you have room in your home, just offer it. You can meet the people first before you make a final choice. But take the first step and at least offer it. It might be the best thing you could ever do....


Thanks for all you do.

Sincerely,

–Noah T. Winer and the whole MoveOn.org Civic Action team
Tuesday, September 13th, 2005
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments